blocked attachments in outlook

Attachments Processor for Outlook: process e-mail attachments as safely as we can!

The main efficient feature of the Attachments Processor add-in for Microsoft Office Outlook is replacing attached files in the messages with the shortcuts. This procedure allows reducing mailbox size – and therefore, improves Outlook productivity for the customers with large e-mail base.

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How to unblock attachment blocked in Outlook

Has your Outlook recently blocked an attachment from an important sender who you felt most uncomfortable getting back to? Is it a persistent issue? If you deal with a lot of attached files in your correspondence, you might have noticed that Outlook blocks items based on their file type. And if you have a lot of your attachments blocked, you might have already been looking for relevant Outlook settings – without any apparent result.

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What to do when Outlook blocks attachment?

Your colleague sent you a script file or HTML Help (.chm) document or even link (.lnk) to the file stored in the file server but Outlook blocks access to the file. What to do? Outlook blocks certain attachments or, rather, blocks access to certain types of received files, because of potential risks associated with these file types. The file type, indicated in the extension, a few letters following the dot at the end of filename, determines whether the file may or may not present a potential threat to the user’s security. For this, Outlook has a blacklist of potentially hazardous file types including a few dozens of items, such as .exe, .bat, and .cmd. (full list of blocked attachments can be viewed here: https://support.office.com/en-US/Article/Blocked-attachments-in-Outlook-434752e1-02d3-4e90-9124-8b81e49a8519). As you may have noticed, the key word of the paragraph is ‘potential’, and that is to say, unlike your anti-virus, Outlook can’t tell whether the file is really dangerous or not. As a result, it blocks a lot of useful files, even if they come from highly trusted senders, just to be on the safe side. The question is, why does it happen?

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